January 21st, 2013

Inauguration Throwback: “Oh my gosh I just saw the President and First Lady dance” grin

January 21st, 2013
Inauguration Throwback: A look at J.Crew’s homepage four years ago today

Inauguration Throwback: A look at J.Crew’s homepage four years ago today

October 15th, 2012

That time I was in The Guardian talking about what Obama should wear in the second presidential debate

October 4th, 2012

Silent Jim Lehrer isn’t gonna take it any—oh, okay. Just another minute maybe. …sure, okay, go ahead.

(@SilentJimLehrer)

October 3rd, 2012

Happy First Presidential Debate of the Season Day!*

*yes, that is totally a day

gq:

Your Morning Shot: John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon

From the first-ever televised presidential debate, September 26, 1960.

Reblogged from The GQ Tumblr
January 16th, 2012
Over the weekend, the Huffington Post ran a piece on “Civil Rights Style” to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. While I found the whole thing to be a little — can I say “glib” without it automatically conjuring up Tom Cruise yet? I can’t, can I? – with the pat nature of the article (they dressed well so they achieved their goals!), I found myself nodding in agreement at much of it.
Writing about the style of MLK and other leaders of the civil rights movement, the author pointed out the importance of dressing in a way that commanded respect for these cultural influencers. Rosa Parks in her skirt suit being fingerprinted after refusing to move to the back of the bus. MLK in a fedora and well-tailored separates marching in Washington DC. Malcolm X and his bow tie. While their messages may have stirred controversy, their clothes certainly didn’t. 
The lesson of dressing the part for political change has resonance still today. If you want your message, your voice, your movement to be taken seriously, you have to present yourself in such a way that those in charge will stop and take notice. Look at the Occupy Wall Street protestors. How many scourges against OWS gleefully decry the participants’ dirty hippie style? And really, is it any surprise that a protestor dressed in a baja hoodie and dreadlocks has trouble finding common ground with a banker in a three-piece suit? 
Your appearance is the first impression other people have of you. It doesn’t matter if that person cares about “fashion” (or if you do either, for that matter); you’re telegraphing a message with every untucked shirt or every untied shoelace. Conversely, clothes that fit, shoes that are polished, hair that’s under control (even if it’s long) say,  “I respect myself - and you - enough to make an effort to dress appropriately for the occasion. Please take me seriously.” Everyone from a college grad interviewing for his first job, to a guy meeting his girlfriend’s parents for the first time knows this is true. And if they don’t, they should.  
It’s things like this that remind me that style isn’t silly, and it’s not inconsequential. Rather, it’s worth paying attention to your appearance because how you look matters to other people, and that should matter to you.

Over the weekend, the Huffington Post ran a piece on “Civil Rights Style” to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. While I found the whole thing to be a little — can I say “glib” without it automatically conjuring up Tom Cruise yet? I can’t, can I? – with the pat nature of the article (they dressed well so they achieved their goals!), I found myself nodding in agreement at much of it.

Writing about the style of MLK and other leaders of the civil rights movement, the author pointed out the importance of dressing in a way that commanded respect for these cultural influencers. Rosa Parks in her skirt suit being fingerprinted after refusing to move to the back of the bus. MLK in a fedora and well-tailored separates marching in Washington DC. Malcolm X and his bow tie. While their messages may have stirred controversy, their clothes certainly didn’t. 

The lesson of dressing the part for political change has resonance still today. If you want your message, your voice, your movement to be taken seriously, you have to present yourself in such a way that those in charge will stop and take notice. Look at the Occupy Wall Street protestors. How many scourges against OWS gleefully decry the participants’ dirty hippie style? And really, is it any surprise that a protestor dressed in a baja hoodie and dreadlocks has trouble finding common ground with a banker in a three-piece suit?

Your appearance is the first impression other people have of you. It doesn’t matter if that person cares about “fashion” (or if you do either, for that matter); you’re telegraphing a message with every untucked shirt or every untied shoelace. Conversely, clothes that fit, shoes that are polished, hair that’s under control (even if it’s long) say,  “I respect myself - and you - enough to make an effort to dress appropriately for the occasion. Please take me seriously.” Everyone from a college grad interviewing for his first job, to a guy meeting his girlfriend’s parents for the first time knows this is true. And if they don’t, they should.

It’s things like this that remind me that style isn’t silly, and it’s not inconsequential. Rather, it’s worth paying attention to your appearance because how you look matters to other people, and that should matter to you.

January 3rd, 2012

You guys. YOU GUYS.

The New York Times is finally - finally! - covering the Iowa caucus like they should have been all along…by judging the candidates based on their fashion sense.

News flash: Rick Santorum loves sweater vests. And that’s why he’s going to win Iowa (editor’s note: or something. I didn’t actually read the article).

April 4th, 2011
Think you can’t mix and match prints? Take a cue from our commander-in-chief, seen here combining Serifs and Gotham* in his re-election logo.
Bold choice, Mr. President.
*What? Fonts are totally just like clothes.

Think you can’t mix and match prints? Take a cue from our commander-in-chief, seen here combining Serifs and Gotham* in his re-election logo.

Bold choice, Mr. President.

*What? Fonts are totally just like clothes.

(we'll never spam you, or flood you with forwards like your mom does)

About

Hi, I'm Megan Collins.

I love helping guys grow their personal style, because when you look good, you feel good.